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Submission deadline: 30-05-2020


More information here.


"Science Gallery Bengaluru seeks interactive, participatory works for CONTAGION, an exhibition that explores the phenomenon of the transmission of emotions, behaviours, and diseases.

The domino effect, the ripple effect, or the ability of one event to set off a chain of others has been known and described in various ways. From a yawn in a classroom setting off a wave of them to a chain reaction within a nuclear reactor leading to the creation of energy, this effect can be seen everywhere.

Human social interactions are among the most studied examples of this. We have observed historically that our ability to travel, combined with our need to communicate and connect, has led to some of the worst epidemics. Within the human body, the spread of infection from cell to cell requires communication and strategy, which is well exhibited by microorganisms, viruses, and parasites.

Emotions are contagious too! Our everyday lives are filled with examples of how we “catch” subtle or complex emotions, such as happiness, anger, panic, or depression, from other people. We see this contagion manifested in social phenomena like the mass protests, violent riots, or the selling panics and buying frenzies of the stock market. Research has shown that moving against the crowd provokes the alarm circuits in our brain, while conformity keeps us calm. This has formed the basis for much of the advertising, propaganda and social media.

Psychologists, anthropologists, virologists, historians, designers, health workers, artists, and neuroscientists have studied how and why human minds and bodies are captured and cultivated by viruses, visionaries, and vogue.

We at Science Gallery Bengaluru are looking to work with such individuals or groups – preferably from across career and disciplinary backgrounds - who are critically exploring diverse contagions in the contemporary context and those engaged with emerging research. Your application can be an artistic or a scientific inquiry, or both. (...)"